Sustainable Waste Management Project

Rubbish dumps are a breeding ground for mosquitoes, Sierra Leone has one of the world’s highest infant mortality rates, 70% of these deaths are caused by Malaria.

THE RUBBISH PROBLEM

Freetown’s towering dumps of rubbish, broken glass and rotting food are not only breeding grounds for mosquitoes, bu provide an livelihood for some of Sierra Leone’s poorest people. Picking through the often hazardous waste, children as young as ten spend their days searching of food and things to sell. With 87% of the population without access to a safe toilet, the public health challanges are enormous.

CHOLERA AND MALARIA

With piles of festering uncollected rubbish in many major cities, cholera and malaria are prevalent. In 2012, 12 of Sierra leone’s 13 districts reported the worst Cholera outbreaks for 15 years with almost 20,000 cases. Malaria is “hyper endemic” and one of the major killers of children under five while the Ebola epidemic coninues to threaten the country.

ADVOCATING FOR AN ALTERNATIVE

in xxxx, we created a sustainable waste projectto address this rubbish problem at its source. This includes maximum waste recovery by composting, recycling, and reuse, and aims at zero waste to be disposed onto dump-yards and landfills. More specifically, by using composting methods to manage the biodegradable waste, the project aims to:

 

TRANSFORMING TRASH INTO POTENTIAL

The objective of this project was to reduce environmental degradation caused by solid waste through Sustainable Waste Management (SWM). This included maximum waste recovery by composting, recycling, and reuse, and aimed at zero waste to be disposed onto dump-yards and landfills.

More specifically, by using composting methods to manage the biodegradable waste, the project aims to minimise the amount of waste that needs to be disposed in centralized landfills, thus extending existing landfill capacity.

 

In addition, the project helped to reduce the environmental impact of disposal sites as the bio-degradable waste fraction largely is to blame for the polluting leachate and the methane problems;

The soil also benefitted as organic agriculture practices were promoted and local farmers were trained on the use of organic compost instead of chemical fertilisers;A fuel-briquette making enterprise was also established using simple technologies available in communities to generate income for women and school dropouts.


Funded by:


bwgef bwUNDP